Monday, December 4, 2017

LIST OF WORKS INCLUDED


USTheater, Opera, and Performance

TABLE OF CONTENTS
(alphabetical by playwright)

John Adams and Peter Sellars (USA)

Aeschylus (Ancient Greece)

Ilse Aichinger (Austria)


Eleanor Antin (USA)
"On Credit" (on Before the Revolution) by Douglas Messerli

Julie Archer and Lee Breuer (USA)
"The Locked Windows" (on Archer's and Breuer's Peter and Wendy) by Douglas Messerli

John Arden (England/Ireland)
"Pulling Down the Roof" (on Serjeant Musgrave's Dance) by Douglas Messerli

Bea Arthur (USA)
"Jenny Pirate" (by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill)

Robert Ashley (USA)
"An American Original" (on the death of Ashley and a concert in 2015 at Redcat in Los Angeles)

Charles Atlas (photographer), Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener (choreographers) (USA)
"Communal Rituals and Desires" (on Atlas', Mitchell's and Riener's Tesseract) by Douglas Messerli

Back to Back Theatre (Australia)
"Playing the Play" (on Ganesh Versus the Third Reich) by Douglas Messerli

Béla Balázs  see Béla Bartok

Joe Arias (USA)
"Strange Fruit" on Arias' Billie Holiday Centennial Concert) by Douglas Messerli

Joey Arias and Basil Twist (USA)
"This Is It" (on Arias with a Twist and Michael Jackson) by Douglas Messerli

Zelim Bakaev (Russia)
Murdered Russian pop-singer, killed in Chenya evidently because he was gay [link]
Two songs, including his famed "Nana."

Amiri Baraka (USA)
"Essential Dichotomies" (on Baraka's "The Toilet" and on his life and poetry) by Douglas Messerli 

Djuna Barnes (USA)
"Freeling Family" (on Djuna Barnes' Biography of Julie van Bartmann) by Douglas Messerli
Three from the Earth
"The Days on Jig Cook" (on George Cram Cook and the Provincetown Players)
"Djuna Barnes' Roots," (on the short plays of Djuna Barnes) by Douglas Messerli

"The Songs of Synge"
The Antiphon

J. M. Barrie (b. Scotland/England)
"The Old Lady Shows Her Medals" (printed play)
"The Old Lady Shows Her Medals" (radio play with the Barrymores)
"Bond of Age" (on Barrie's "Rosalind" and "The Old Lady Shows Her Medals") by Douglas Messerli
"The Locked Windows" (on Archer's and Breuer's Peter and Wendy, based on a novel by J. M. Barrie) by Douglas Messerli


Béla Bartok (Hungary)
"Locking Up Being" (on Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle) by Douglas Messerli
"What's Love Got To Do with It?" (on Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle) by Douglas Messerli

Tina Bausch (Germany)
"You Know What I Mean" (on Bausch's Ten Chi and Richard Foreman's Deep Trance Behavior in Potatoland) by Douglas Messerli

Samuel Beckett (Ireland/France)
"Be Again" (on Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape)
"Nell's Death" (on Beckett's Endgame) by Douglas Messerli
"Living in the Details" (on Beckett's Waiting for Godot) by Douglas Messerli (Los Angeles Production)
"Little Catastrophes" (on Beckett's Act Without Words II, Come and Go, Catastrophe, Footfalls, and
     Krapp's Last Tape) by Douglas Messerli (at Los Angeles' Odyssey Theatre)
"Sweating It: Three Mid-Century Tragi-Comedies) (on Beckett's Waiting for Godot) by Douglas Messerli (New York Production)
"Talking the Tears Away" (on Beckett's Happy Days) by Douglas Messerli
Interview with and performance of Krapp's Last Tape by Harold Pinter

Belarus Free Theatre (Belarus)
"Sunday, Bloody, Sunday (2)" (on the company's Being Harold Pinter) by Douglas Messerli

David Belasco (USA)
The Return of Peter Grimm

Hans Bellmer (Germany)
"Notes on the Ball Joint"

Shelley Berc (USA)
A Girl's Guide to the Divine Comedy

Alban Berg (Germany)
"Desire Severed from Award" (on Berg's Lulu as performed at the MET Opera) by Douglas Messerli

Hector Berlioz (France)
"Delusion and Dream" (on Berlioz' Les troyens) by Douglas Messerli

Felix Bernstein (USA)
Singing "Goodbye Old Girl" from Damn Yankees at age 12

Leonard Bernstein (USA)
"I Can Cook Too" (from Bernstein's On the Town) by Douglas Messerli
"America" (from Bernstein's West Side Story) by Douglas Messerli
"It's Love" (on Bernstein's Wonderful Town) by Douglas Messerli
"Spiritual Uplift" (on Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti)
"Three Bernstein New Yorks" (on Bernstein's On the Town, Wonderful Town, and West Side Story) by Douglas Messerli

Chuck Berry (USA)
Chuck Berry singing "Johnny B. Goode" / live performance [link]

Susan Birkenhead (USA)
see Bob Martin

Georges Bizet (France)
"Love vs. Faith" (on Bizet's The Pearl Fishers) by Douglas Messerli

Jens Bjørneboe (Norway)
The Bird Lovers
 "Cataloging Evil" (on Bjørneboe's The Bird Lovers and Semmelweis) by Douglas Messerli

Lily Blau (USA)
"Differential Equations" (on Blau's The Missing Pages of Lewis Carroll) by Douglas Messerli

Marc Blitzstein (USA)
"I Wish It So" (from Juno) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli

Jerry Bock (USA)
"On the Side of the Angels" (on the deaths of Bock, Joseph Stein, and Tom Bosley) by Douglas Messerli 
"Writing Tenderly" (on Jerry Bock's, Sheldon Harnick's and Joe Masteroff's She Loves Me) by Douglas Messerli

Maxwell Bodenheim and Ben Hecht (USA)
The Master Poisoner

Fats Domino (USA)
"Ain't That a Shame" (sung by Domino)

Tom Bosley (USA)
"On the Side of the Angels" (on the deaths of Bock, Joseph Stein, and Tom Bosley) by Douglas Messerli

Matthew Bourne (England)
"Dance of Surprises" (on Matthew Bourne's Early Adventures) by Douglas Messerli

David Bowie (England)
"My Death" (Jacques Brel's song, "La Mort" sung by Bowie] [link]
"Panic in Detroit" (sung by Bowie) [link]
"The Port of Amsterdam" ("Amsterdam") (Jacques Brel's song sung by Bowie) [link]

Jane Bowles (USA)
"A Necessary Remedy" (on Bowles' In the Summer House) by Douglas Messerli

Bertolt Brecht (Germany)
"Moon of Alabama" from The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny
Selected Audio Works

Stephan Brecht (b. Germany/USA)
"Stage and Street" (on the theater writings of Brecht) by Douglas Messerli
Jacques Brel (Belgium)
Douglas Messerli | "Jacques Brel Is Dead and Worth Resurrecting" (on Jacques Brel Is Alive and
     Well and Living in Paris)
"Dans le port d'Amsterdam" (sung by Brel) [link]
"Fanette" (sung by Brel) [link]
"La Mort" (sung by Brel) [link]
"Quand on n'a que l'amour" (sung by Brel) [link]
"Les Vieux" ("Old Folks") (sung by Brel) [link]

Lee Breuer (USA)
Porto Morco
"Barnyard Philosophers" (on Breuer's Summa Dramatica and Porco Morto) by Douglas Messerli 


Lee Breuer and Maude Mitchell (USA)
"You Great Big Beautiful Doll" (on Mabou Mines Dollhouse) by Douglas Messerli

Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice, Bob Gaudio and Bob Crewe (USA)
"Everybody Leaves" (on Brickman's, Elice's, Gaudio's, and Crewe's Jersey Boys) by Douglas Messerli

Benjamin Britten (England)
"Celebrating Liberation" (on Eric Crozier's and Britten's Albert Herring) by Douglas Messerli
"The Darkness Understands and Suffer" (on E. M. Forster, Eric Crozier, and Britton's Billy Budd) by Douglas Messerli
"The Piper's Son" (on Myfanwy Piper's and Britten's The Turn of the Screw) by Douglas Messerli

Peter Brook (with Marie-Hélène Estienne  and based on The Mahabharata, by Jean-Claude Carrière
     (England)
"Going On" (on The Battlefield) by Douglas Messerli

Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, Willie Gilbert, and Frank Loesser (USA)
"The Company Way" (on How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying) by Douglas Messerli
see also Frank Loesser
 Jez Butterworth (England)
"Sunday, Blood Sunday" (on Butterworth's Jerusalem) by Douglas Messerli

John Cage (USA)
"Nothing on a Lecture (on Robert Wilson's performance of Cage's Lecture on Nothing) by Douglas Messerli

Alexi Kaye Campbell (Greece/England)
"Both Sides of Love" (on Campbell's The Pride) by Douglas Messerli

Karel Čapek (Czechoslavakia/now Czech Republic)
R. U. R. (Rossum's Universal Robots)

Al Carmines (based on Gertrude Stein) (USA)
In Circles
Promenade (with Maria Irene Fornes)

Aimé Césaire (Martinique)
"Trying to Be Everything" (on Césaire's Une Saison Au Congo) by Douglas Messerli

Anton Chekhov (Russia)
"The Dogs Howl" (on Chekhov's The Seagull) by Douglas Messerli

Moose Charlap (music) (with Irene Mecchi (teleplay, based on the play by J. M. Barrie), Carolyn Leigh, Betty Comden and Adolph Green (lyrics, with additional lyrics by Amanda Green) and Jule Styne (music) (USA)
"Walkin' the Plank (on Peter Pan Live! [TV production, 2014]) by Douglas Messrli

Marissa Chibas (with Erik Ehn and Travis Preston) (USA)
Listening (on Chibas', Ehns', and Preston's Brewsie and Willie) by Douglas Messerli

Lucinda Childs (USA)
"Unaltered Images of Movement" (on Childs', Adams', and Gehry's Available Light) by Douglas Messerli

Julia Cho (USA)
"Dead Languagaes" (on Cho's The Language Archive) by Douglas Messerli

Jean Cocteau (France)
Complete recordings of theater, performances and other works (link with UBUWeb)

Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh (USA)
"Hey, Look Me Over" (on Coleman's and Leigh's Wildcat) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by
     Douglas Messerli

Betty Comden and Adolph Green (see also Jule Styne)

Betty Comden and Adloph Green (see also Leonard Bernstein)

Barbara Cook (USA)
"Getting to Know Her" (on Cook singing at the Wallis Annenberg Theatre) by Douglas Messerli

George Cram Cook (USA)
"The Days of Jig Cook" (on Cook and the Provincetown Players) by Djuna Barnes

George Cram Cook and Susan Glaspell (USA)
Suppressed Desires
"Celebration of Suppression" (on Cook's and Glaspell's Suppressed Desires) by Douglas Messerli


David Crosby (USA)
"She's Got To Be Somewhere" (song) [link]

Eric Crosier (England) see Benjamin Britten

Noël Coward (England)
"Breaking Away" (on Coward's Blithe Spirit) by Douglas Messerli
"Why Do the Wrong People Travel?" (from Sail Away) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by
     Douglas Messerli

Bob Crewe see Marshall Brickman

Tim Crouch (England)
"The Miracle of Art" (on Crouch's An Oak Tree) by Douglas Messerli

Stan Daniels (USA) see Joseph Stein
Gordon Davidson (USA)
"Creating Los Angeles Theater" (on the death of Gordon Davidson) by Douglas Messerli
Claude Debussy (France)
"The Outsiders" (on Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande) by Douglas Messerli 

Shelagh Delaney (England)
"Permanent Outsiders" (on Delaney's A Taste of Honey) by Douglas Messerli
"Thieves of Love" (on Delaney's A Taste of Honey) by Douglas Messerli

Mark Dion (USA)
see David Lang

Gaetano Donizetti (Italy)
"Battling Divas" (on Giuseppe Bardari's and Gaetano Donizetti's Maria Stuarda) by Douglas Messerli
"Scarf and Ring" (on Donizetti's Roberto Dovereaux) by Douglas Messerli

Antonín Dvořák (Czechoslavakia)
"Raping Nature" (on Dvořák's Rusalka) by Douglas Messerli

Elevator Repair Service (USA)
"Problems with the Text" (on Elevator Repair Services' Arguendo) by Douglas Messerli

Rick Elice (USA)
"Wasted on Youth" (on Elice's Peter and the Starcatcher) by Douglas Messerli
see also Marshall Brickman

Everly Brothers (USA)
"Bye Bye Love" (on the Everly Brothers and Phil Everly's death) by Douglas Messerli

Daniel Ezralow (USA)
"Pure Ecastasy" (on Ezralow Dance's Primo Passo) by Douglas Messerli

Cy Feuer (USA)
"The Brotherhood" (on Cy Feuer and his death) by Douglas Messerli

Karen Finley (USA)
"The Escaped Unicorn" (on Finley's performance The Expanded Unicorn Gratitude Mystery) by     
     Douglas Messerli

William Finn and James Lapine (USA)
"Something Bad Is Happening" (on Finn's and Lapine's Falsettos) by Douglas Messerli

Ronald Firbank (England)
"The Princess Zoubaroff"

Richard Foreman (USA)
Deep Trance Behavior in Potatoland
"The Unfortunate Truth of My Situtation" (on Foremlan's Old-Fashioned Prostitutes) by Douglas
Messerli 
"You Know What I Mean" (on Foreman's Deep Trance Behavior in Potatoland and Tina Bausch's
Ten Chi) by Douglas Messerli

Maria Irene Fornes (b. Cuba/USA)
"The Power of Desperation" (on The Conduct of Life) by Douglas Messerli
"A Very Long Walk" (on Promenade) by Douglas Messerli
"Rain of Summons" (on Fefu on and Her Friends) by Douglas Messerli

Jackson C. Frank (USA)
singing "Milk and Honey" and "Blues Run the Game"

Scott Frankel (USA) see Doug Wright

Max Frisch (Switzerland)
"The Conflagration" (on Frisch's The Arsonists) by Douglas Messerli

George Furth (USA) see Stephen Sondheim

Juan Gabriel (Mexico)
"Amor Eterno" [link]

Peter Galison (USA) (see William Kentridge)

Armand Gatti (Monaco/France)
Two Plays: The 7 Possibilities from Train 713 Departing from Auschwitz and
Public Song Before Two Electric Chairs


Susan Glaspell (USA)
Trifles
see also George Cook Cram

Betty Garrett (USA)
"I'm Still Here: Two Valentines" (on performances by Garrett and Eliane Stritch) by Douglas Messerli

Bob Gaudio see Marshall Brickman

Jack Gelber (USA)
"Eye to Eye" (on Gelber's Square in the Eye and Arnold Weinstein's Red Eye of Love) by Douglas Messerli

Robin Gibb (an the Bee Gees) (England)
"Close Another Door" [link]

Philip Glass, Robert Wilson, Lucinda Childs, and Christopher Knowles (USA)
"This One Is Being Very America" (on Glass, Wilson, and Child's Einstein on the Beach) by Douglas Messerli
"Send in the Clowns" (on Glass' Akhnaten) by Douglas Messerli

James Goldman (USA)
"Slightly Sour" (on Goldman's and Sondheim's Follies) by Douglas Messerli

Annie Gosfield (with Yuval Sharon) (USA)
"Architecture Saves the Day" (on Gosfield's and Sharon's opera War of the Worlds) by Douglas
     Messerli      

Philip Kan Gotanda (USA)
"Mixed Messages" (on Gotanda's Remember the I-Hotel) by Douglas Messerli

Allen Graubard (USA)
"Comment on Gellu Naum's The Taus Watch Repair Shop"

Alice Goodman, Peter Sellars, and John Adams (USA)
"Six Degrees of Insanity" (on Goodman's, Sellars', and Adams' Nixon in China) by Douglas Messerli

David Greenspan (USA)
Son of an Engineer
"Going Nowhere" (on Greenspan's Go Back to Where You Are) by Douglas Messerli

Tammy Grimes (USA)
"Are You Sure?" (on the death of singer/actor Tammy Grimes) by Douglas Messerli

John Guare (USA)
"On Red Eye of Love"

Dan Guerrero (USA)
"Mariachi to Merman" (on ¡Gaytino! ) by Douglas Messerli

Peter Hall (England)
"Animal Uproar" (on George Orwell's Animal Farm) by Douglas Messerli

Oscar Hammerstein II and Richard Rodgers (USA) see Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II

George Frideric Handel (England)
"Tears and Hope" (on Giulio Cesare) by Douglas Messerli

Lorraine Hansberry (USA)
"The Reluctant Warrior" (on Hansberry's Les Blancs) by Douglas Messerli
"Survivors" (on A Raisin in the Sun) by Douglas Messerli
E. Y. Harburg and Burton Lane (USA), My Favorite Theater Songs, "How Are Things in Glocca Mora?" by Douglas Messerli

Sheldon Harnick and Jerry Bock (USA)
My Favorite Theater Songs,"Will He Like Me" (from Harnick and Bock's She Loves Me) by Douglas Messerli
"Writing Tenderly" (on Harnick's, Bock's and Masteroff's She Loves Me) by Douglas Messerli

James Harris (USA)
"Theater in the Merry-Go-Round" (on James Harris's An Illegal Start) by Pablo Capra

John Hawkes (USA)
"The Empty Pool" (on Hawkes' The Innocent Party) by Douglas Messerli

Jake Heggie (USA)
"The Face of God" (On Heggie's and Terrence MacNally's Dead Man Walking) by Douglas Messerli
"Embracing the Cannibal" (on Heggie and Gene Scheer's Moby-Dick) by Douglas Messerli

Matthew S. Hinton (USA)
Drake Disappears

Lucas Hnath (USA)
"What Does It Mean to Believe?" (on Hnath's The Christians)

Billie Holliday (USA)
"Pennies from Heaven" sung by Billie Holiday [link]
"Stormy Weather" sung by Billie Holliday (1952) [link]
Billie Holiday singing "September Song" and others

Hotel Modern (and Arthur Sauer)
"Toy Soldiers" (on their production of The Great War) by Douglas Messerli

Henrik Ibsen (Norway)
"The Man Who Stands Alone" (on Ibsen's An Enemy of the People) by Douglas Messerli
When We Dead Awaken
"When We Dead Awaken" (on Ibsen's play) by C. H. A. Bjerregaard
Hedda Gabler 
"Burned Up" (on Ibsen's Hedda Gabler) by Douglas Messerli
"Ibsen's New Drama" by James Joyce

Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa (Italy) see Giacomo Puccini

Eugène Ionesco (Romania/France)
"Sweating It: Three Mid-Century Tragi-Comedies" (on Ionesco's Exit the King, Waiting for Godot and West Side Story) by Douglas Messerli
"Growing Horns" (on Ionesco's Rhinoceros) by Douglas Messerli

Hugh Jackman (Australia) and cast
"I Go to Rio" from The Boy from Oz [link]

Michael Jackson (USA)
"This Is It" (on Jackson's filmed rehearsals and Joey Arias and Basil Twist's Arias with a Twist) by Douglas Messerli

Tom Jacobson (USA)
"Asking Questions" (on Jacobson's Captain of the Bible Team Quiz) by Douglas Messerli

Henry James (USA)
Summersolft

Alfred Jarry (France)
Early chansons, lectures about Jarry, and a film version of Ubu Roi (link to Ubuweb)
Ubu Roi (film version by Jean-Christophe Averty)

David Javerbaum (USA)
"Holy Lite" (on Javerbaum's An Act of God) by Douglas Messerli

Len Jenkin (USA)
"Heart of Darkness" (on Jenkin's Dark Ride) by Douglas Messerli
Dream Express (link with Jenkin's site)

John, Paul, and Mary [Peter Yarrow, Paul Stookey, and Mary Travers] (USA)
"Where Have All the Flowers Gone" [link]
Tom Jones (USA)
see Harvey Schmidt

Rajiv Joseph (USA)
"Accidents of History" (on Joesph's Archduke) by Douglas Messerli
"Damaged Goods" (on Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries) by Douglas Messerli
"Tyger! Tyger! Burning Bright" (on Joseph's Bengal Tiger in the Baghdad Zoo) by Douglas Messerli

James Joyce (Ireland)
"Ibsen's New Drama"

Dennis Kelly and Tim Minchin (England)
"Loud and Quiet" (on Kelly's and Minchin's Matilda) by Douglas Messerli

Robert Kelly (USA)
"Monologues for Orpheus: A Dance Play"

Adrienne Kennedy (USA)
"Herselves: A Chamber Piece" (on Kennedy's Funnyhhouse of a Negro) by Douglas Messerli

William Kentridge (South Africa)
"Undoing, Unsaying" (on Kentridge, Philip Miller, Dada Masilo, Catherine Meyburgh, and Peter Galison's Refuse the Hour) by Douglas Messerli

Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II (USA)
"Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man of Mine" (from Showboat) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by
     Douglas Messerli
"Ol' Man River" (from Showboat) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli

Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach (USA)
"Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" (sung by The Platters, 1958) [link]

B. B. King (USA)
"The Thrill" (on a performance and King's death) by Douglas Messerli

Oscar Kokoschka (Austria)
Murderer the Women's Hope

Bernard-Marie Koltès (France)
"Men in the Streets" (on the Zeromski Theatre's production of In the Solitude of Cotton Fields) by Douglas Messerli

Michael Korie (USA) see Doug Wright

Alfred Kreymborg (USA)
Jack's House (A Cubic-Play)
Lima Beans
"Food for Love" (on Kreymborg's Lima Beans) by Douglas Messerli


Damish Kudaibergen (Kazakhstan)
"Adagio" (sung by Damish Kudiabergen) [link]

Tony Kushner (USA)
"Crashing Through the Ceiling of Despair" (on Kushner's Angels in America: Millennium Approaches) by Douglas Messerli

Tom La Farge (USA)
Talking While Shaving
Burton Lane (USA) (see E. Y. Harburg)

Jeffrey Lane and David Yazbek (USA)
"No One's Home" (on Lane's and Yazbek's Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown) by Douglas Messerli

David Lang (USA)
"Where Is Evil?" (on Lang's and Dion's Anatomy Theater) by Douglas Messerli

James Lapine (USA)
"Out of the Woods" (on Lapine's and Sondheim's Into the Woods) by Douglas Messerli

Miklos Laszlo (Hungary/USA)
"Working Against Love" (on Laszlo's Parfumerie) by Douglas Messerli 

Arthur Laurents (USA)
"Three Bernstein New Yorks" (on West Side Story and two other Bernstein musicals) by Douglas Messerli
"Sweating It: Three Mid-Century Tragi-Comedies" (on West Side Story and plays by Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco) by Douglas Messerli
"The Coward's Hand" (on Laurents' Home of the Brave) by Douglas Messerli
"A Necessary Vacuum" (on Laurents' Gypsy) by Douglas Messerli

Deborah Lawlor (USA)
"Leaping Out" (on Lawlor's play Freddy) by Douglas Messerli

Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee (USA)
"The Gang's Still Here" (on Lawrence's and Lee's The Gang's All Here) by Douglas Messerli
"My Broadway Hit" (on a celebration for Jerome Lawrence) by Douglas Messerli


Stacey Levine (USA)
"The Good House" (in Levine's Susan Moneymaker, Large and Small) by Douglas Messerli
Susan Moneymaker, Large and Small: A Ten Minute Play

Frank Loesser (USA)
"Chance and Chemistry" (on Loesser's, Swerling's and Burrows' Guys and Dolls) by Douglas Messerli
My Favorite Musical Theater Songs, "Adelaide's Lament" (from Guys and Dolls) by Douglas Messerli
My Favorite Musical Theater Songs, "I Believe in Your" (from How to Succeed in Business without
     Really Trying) by Douglas Messerli
My Favorite Theater Songs, "Luck Be a Lady" (from Guys and Dolls) by Douglas Messerli
My Favorite Theater Songs, "Never Will I Mary" (from Greenwillow) by Douglas Messerli

Kirk Lynn (USA)
"Approaching the Real" (on Lynn's The Method Gun) by Douglas Messerli

Tracy Letts (USA)
"Muddy Boots" (on Letts' August: Osage County) by Douglas Messerli

Joshua Logan (USA) see Oscar Hammerstein II

Terrence MacNally (USA) see Jake Heggie

Maurice Maeterlinck (Belgium)
The Intruder

Claudio Magris (Italy)
To Have Been
Voices: Three Plays

F. T. Marinetti (and others) (Italy)
"The Futurist Synthetic Theater"

Bob Martin (USA)
"Warm Up" (on Martin's, Charles Strouse's, and Susan Birkenhead's Minsky's) by Douglas Messerli

Dada Masilo  (South Africa) (see William Kentridge)

Jules Massenet (France)
"Between Duty and the Devil" (on Massenet's Werther) by Douglas Messerli

Joe Masteroff (USA)
'Writing Tenderly" (on Masteroff's, Harnick's and Bock's She Loves Me) by Douglas Messerli

Vladimir Mayakovsky (Russia)
Vladimir Mayakovsky: Tragedy in Two Acts with a Prologue and an Epilogue
The Bathtub (adapted by Paul Schmidt)

Missy Mazzoli (USA)
"Glimpses of a Vaster Landscape" (on Mazzoli's opera Song from the Uproar) by Douglas Messerli

Benjamin Millepied (b. France / USA)
"The Architectonics of Love" (on the L.A. Dance Project's performance at The Wallis Annenberg
      Center for Performing Arts) by Douglas Messerli

Gian Carlo Menotti (Italy/USA)
"Is There Anyone To Whom the Heart Can Be Explained?" (on Menotti's opera The Consul) by
     Douglas Messerli

Bob Merrill (USA)
"Mira (Can You Imagine That?)" (on Merrill's song from Carnival!) by Douglas Messerli
see also Jule Styne

Catherine Meyburgh (South Africa) (see William Kentridge)

Arthur Miller (USA)
"Tearing Down Bridges" (on Miller's A View from the Bridge) by Douglas Messerli
"Whatever Happend to Willy Loman?" (on Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman) by Douglas Messerli

Tim Miller (USA)
"Tokyo Tim"

Philip Miller  (South Africa) (see William Kentridge)

Rashaun Mitchell (USA) (see Charles Atlas)

Jelly Roll Morton (USA)
"An American Epic" (on Poor Dog Group's production of The Murder Ballad [1938]) by Douglas Messerli

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Germany)
Douglas Messerli Bad Day on the Seville Streets (on Lorenzo da Ponte's and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozarts's Don Giovanni)
Douglas Messerli Terrifying Twists (on Lorenzo da Ponte's and Mozart's Le Nozze di Figaro)
Douglas Messerli Emblems of Love (on Emanuel Schikaneder's and Mozart's The Magic Flute)

Gellu Naum (Romania)
The Taus Watch Repair Shop

Jacques Offenbach (Germany/France) (with Jules Barbier and Michael Carre. based on E.T.A.Hoffmann)
"Love and Tears" (on Offenbach's Tales of Hoffmann) by Douglas Messerli

 John O'Keefe (USA)
Reapers
"What Have We Reaped?" (on O'Keefe's Reapers)


Eugene O'Neill (USA)
"The Awakened Emperor" (on O'Neill's The Emperor Jones) by Douglas Messerli
"Standing in the Moonlight" (on O'Neill's Ah, Wilderness!) by Douglas Messerli
"Life in a Cage" (on O'Neill's The Hairy Ape) by Douglas Messerli
"In Control" (on O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night) by Douglas Messerli
"The Endless Voyage" (on O'Neill's Glencairn Plays) by Douglas Messerli
The Moon of the Caribees
"Written in Tears and Blood" (on O'Neill's Long Day's Journey into Night) by Douglas Messerli

Jerry Orbach (USA)
"Try to Remember" from The Fantasticks by Jerry Orbach [link]

The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners (USA)
"Shouts, Screams, Shrieks, Wails and Hoots" (on Luigi Rusolo and The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners) by Douglas Messerli

Rogelio Orizondo and Teatro El Público
"A Tragic Cabaret" (on Antignón, un contigente Épico) by Douglas Messerli

Joe Orton (England)
"Identity in Dashes" (on Orton's What the Butler Saw) by Douglas Messerli

George Orwell (England) (see Peter Hall)

Eric Overmyer (USA)
"The Fire Within" (on Overmyer's Dark Rapture) by Douglas Messerli
"Past Present Future Tense" (on Overymer's On the Verge) by Douglas Messerli

Trey Parker, Robert Lopez, and Matt Stone (USA)
"Look to the Rainbow" (on their musical The Book of Mormon) by Douglas Messerli

Suzan-Lori Parks
"Leap of Faith" (on Parks' Father Comes Home from the Wars, Parts 1, 2 & 3) by Douglas Messerli

Harry Partch (USA)
"Going/Gone Crazy" (on Partch: Windsong at Redcat) by Douglas Messerli

Peter, Paul, and Mary (USA)
"Where Have All the Flowers Gone" (singers) [link]

Kier Peters (Douglas Messerli) (USA)
A Dog Tries to Kiss the Sky
The Rumble
The Confirmation
"Confirming Reality" (on Peters' The Confirmation) by Douglas Messerli
"Kier's Secret German Audience" (on Peters' The Confirmation) by Douglas Messerli
The Wonder

Francesco Mari Piave (Italy) see Giuseppe Verdi

Harold Pinter (England)
"Another Room" (on Pinter's The Room) by Douglas Messerli
"The Homecoming Gift" (on Pinter's The Homecoming) by Douglas Messerli
"Talk" (on Pinter's The Collection) by Douglas Messerli
"The Wasps" (on Pinter's A Slight Ache) by Douglas Messerli

"Service" (on Pinter's The Dumb Waiter) by Douglas Messerli
Interview with and performance of Krapp's Last Tape

Cole Porter (USA) [with P. G. Wodehouse, Guy Bolton, Howard Lindsay, Russell Crouse, Timothy Crouse and John Weidman]
"Anything Goes" (from Porter's Anything Goes" My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas 
     Messerli
"Pure Poetry" (on Porter's Anything Goes) by Douglas Messerli

Francis Poulenc (France)
"Fanatical Martyrs" (on Poulenc's Dialogue of the Carmelites) by Douglas Messerli

Giacomo Puccini (music), Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa (Italy)
"Facing the Cold" (on La Boheme) by Douglas Messerli
"The Blindfold" (on Madama Butterfly, MET production) by Douglas Messerli
"Fin de siecle" (on Madama Butterfly, LAOpera production) by Douglas Messerli
"A Kind of Turandot" (on Madama Butterfly, MET production, 2016) by Douglas Messerli
"The Barbarian Within" (on Turandot, MET production) by Douglas Messerli

Henry Purcell (England)
"Hello, I Must Be Going" (on Purcell and Nahum Tate's Dido and Aeneas) by Douglas Messerli

Philippe Quesne (France)
"Elemental Theater" (on Quesne's La Mélancolie des dragons) by Douglas Messerli 

Peter Quilter (England)
"An Incautious Overdose of Life" (on Quilter's End of the Rainbow) by Douglas Messerli

Hamind Rahanian (Iran/USA)
Hamid Rahmanian (with Vikas Menon) and music by Loga Ramin Torkian and Azam Ali
"The Bird and the Serpent in Love" (on Rahamanian's Feathers of Fire: A Persian Epic) by Douglas Messerli

Nina Raines (England)
"Moonlight" (on Raines' Tribes) by Douglas Messerli

Maurice Ravel (composer) and Colette (libretto)
"Bad Manners" (on Ravel's L'enfant et les sortileges (The Child and the Sorceries) by Douglas Messerli

Vicki Ray (USA)
"It's Elementary" (on Ray's piano concert at Redcat in Feburary 2016) by Douglas Messerli

Elmer Rice (USA)
The Adding Machine
"More Than Zero?" (on the musical version of Rice's The Adding Machine) by Douglas Messerli


Jack Richardson (USA)
"Locked Up" (on Richardson's Gallows Humor) by Douglas Messerli

Silas Riener (USA) (see Charles Atlas)

Paul Robeson (USA)
Robeson singing "The House I Live In" (link)

Mary Rodgers and Marshall Barer (USA)
"Shy" (from Once Upon a Mattress) My Favorite Musical Songs by Douglas Messerli

Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II (USA)
"Bali Ha'i" (from Rodgers' and Hammerstein's South Pacific) from My Favorite Musical Theater 
     Songs by Douglas Messerli
"Confused by Paradise" (on Rodgers' and Hammerstein's South Pacific) by Douglas Messerli
"June Is Bustin' Out All Over" (from Rodgers' and Hammerstein's Carousel) My Favorite Musical
     Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli
"Taming the Barbarians" (on Rodgers' and Hammerstein's The King and I and the film I Married a
     Witch) by Douglas Messerli

Harold Rome (USA)
"I Know Your Kind" (from Destry Rides Again) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas
     Messerli
"Miss Marmelstein" (from I Can Get It for Your Wholesale) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by
     Douglas Messerli

Jerry Ross (see Richard Adler)

Gioachino Rossini (Italy)
"Hidden in Plain Sight" (on Rossini's La donna del lago) by Douglas Messerli

Lugi Russolo (Italy)
The Art of Noises
"Shouts, Screams, Shrieks, Wails and Hoots" (on Lugi Russolo and The Orchestra of Futurist Noise Intoners) by Douglas Messerli

Kaija Saariaho (Finland)
"Love Across Space: The Hero as Poet" (on Saariaho's opera L'Amour de loin) by Douglas Messerli

Kamala Sankaram (USA)
"Power Speaks Lies" (on Sankaram's opera Thumbprint) by Douglas Messerli
Sean San Jose (USA)
 "Mixed Messages" (on San Jose's Presenting....the Monstress!) by Douglas Messerli

Aram Saroyan (USA)
Gertrude and Lew: A Double Bill

Steven Sater and Duncan Sheik [USA] [see Frank Wedekind]

Gene Scheer (see Jake Heggie)

Janet Schlapkohl (USA)
"The Same but Different" (on Schlapkohl's My Sister) by Douglas Messerli

Roland Schimmelpfennig (Germany)
"Telling the Story As It Is Being Told" (on Schimmelpfennig's The Arabian Night and Woman from the Past)

Arthur Schnitzler (Austria)
Hands Around or La Ronde
"An Endless Dance" (on Schnitzler's La Ronde) by Douglas Messerli

Robert Schenkkan (USA)
"A Bigger Wall Than Ever Imagined" (on Schenkkan's Building the Wall) by Douglas Messerli

Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones (USA)
"My Cup Runneth Over" (from I Do, I Do!) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli
"Try To Remember" (from The Fantasticks) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas  
     Messerli

James Scott (USA)
"The Princess Rag" (1911) [link]

Peter Sellars and John Adams (USA)
"A Body Transfixed by the Noonday Sun" (on Sellars' and Adams' The Gosepl According to the Other Mary) by Douglas Messerli
"Six Degrees of Insanity" (on Goodmans', Sellars' and Adams' Nixon in China) by Douglas Messerli

William Shakespeare (England)
"Even the Fool Is Hung" (on Shakespeare's King Lear) by Douglas Messerli

Jackie Shane (USA/Canada)
"Waking the Dog" [link]

George Bernard Shaw (England)
Heartbreak House
"Keeping the Homefires Burning" (on Shaw's Heartbreak House) by Douglas Messerli

Wallace Shawn (USA)
"Even the Thought" (on Shawn's A Thought in Three Parts) by Douglas Messerli
"The Survivor" (on Shawn's The Designated Mourner) by Douglas Messerli

Martin Sherman (USA)
"Talking Sex" (on Sherman's Bent) by Douglas Messerli

Dmitri Shostakovich (USSR)
"Shrill Charm" (on Shostakovich's Nos (The Nose) by Douglas Messerli

Sam Shepard (USA)
"Unburying the Dead" (on Shepard's Buried Child) by Douglas Messerli

Stephen Sondheim (USA)
"The Believers and Those Who Have Lost Faith" (on Furth's and Sondheim's Merrily We Roll    
     Along) by Douglas Messerli
"Johanna" (song from Sweeney Todd) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli
"Not a Day Goes By" (on the song from Merrily We Roll Along) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs
    by Douglas Messerli
"Convincing the Soloist to Join the Band" (on Furth's and Sondheim's Company) by Douglas Messerli
"In Buddy's Eyes" (from Follies) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli
"Into the Woods" (on Lapine's and Sondheim's Into the Woods) by Douglas Messerli
"Sweating It: Three Mid-Century Tragic-Comedies" (on West Side Story, Waiting for Godot and Exit the King) by Douglas Messerli
"A Necessary Vacuum" (on Laurents' and Sondheim's Gypsy) by Douglas Messerli
 "Slightly Sour" (on Goldman's and Sondheim's Follies) by Douglas Messerli

James Strah (USA)
"Shadowing the Shadows" (on Strah's and the Wooster Group's North Atlantic) by Douglas Messerli

Gertrude Stein (USA)
Brewsie and Willie (see Marissa Chibis)
Do Let Us Go Away
a short documentary with original photographs of Stein's and Virgil Thomson's Four Saints in Three Acts
In Circles (music by Al Carmines)
a recording from the Santa Fe Opera of Stein's and Virgil Thomson's opera The Mother of Us All
(UBUweb link)
What Happened: A Five Act Play
Mexico

Joseph Stein (USA)
"Moving on Down" (on Stein and Stan Rice's Enter Laughing) by Douglas Messerli
"On the Side of the Angels" (on Stein, Jerry Bock, and Tom Bosley and their deaths) by Douglas Messerli

John Steppling (USA)
Sea of Cortez
"The Verge of Possibility" (on Steppling's Sea of Cortez) by Douglas Messerli


Richard Strauss (Germany)
"A Dance of Death" (on Strauss' Salome, MET Opera production)
"O Terrible Night" (on Strauss' Salome, LAOpera production)
"Taking Up the Axe" (on Strauss' Electra)
"Yes, Yes" (on Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier, MET Opera production) 

August Strindberg (Sweden)
Creditors
"Adam and Snake" (on Stridberg's Creditors) by Douglas Messerli 
Miss Julie
"The Crazy Lady" (on Strindberg's Miss Julie) by Douglas Messerli
"The Quarantined Couple" (on Strindberg's The Dance of Death) by Douglas Messerli
"Strindberg As Absurdist" (on Strindberg's The Ghost Sonata) by Douglas Messerli 

Elaine Stritch (USA)
"I'm Still Here: Two Valentines" (on performances by Stritch and Betty Garrett) by Douglas Messerli

Charles Strouse (USA) see Bob Martin
Meg Stuart (USA/lives Belgium)
"What Is Dance?" (on Stuart's Hunter) by Douglas Messerli
Jule Styne (USA)
"The Party's Over" (lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green) (from Bells Are Ringing) My    
      Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas Messerli
"People" (lyrics by Bob Merrill) (from Funny Girl) My Favorite Musical Theater Songs by Douglas 
     Messerli

Jule Styne (USA) see Arthur Laurents or Stephen Sondheim
Jule Styne (USA) see Moose Charlap and others

Jo Swerling (USA) see Frank Loesser

John Millington Synge (Ireland)
Riders to the Sea
"The Songs of Synge" (on Synge's plays) by Djuna Barnes

Bill Talen and Savitri D (USA)
"Tigers Got to Hunt" (on Talen's and Savitri D's Reverend Bill and the Life After Shopping Gospel Choir: The Earth-a-Llujah Earth-a-Llujah Revival!) by Douglas Messerli

Booth Tarkington (USA)
Clarence
Nahum Tate  see Henry Purcell

Ronald Tavel (USA)
Andy Warhol's Horse
Lives and Loves of Hedy Lamar
Modest Tchaikovsky (see Peter Tchaikovsky)
Peter Tchaikovsky
"What's Love Got To Do with It?" (on Tchaikovsky's Iolanta) by Douglas Messerli

Fiona Templeton (b. Scotland/USA)
"The Poet's Theater of Fiona Templeton: An Enviornmental View" (on Templeton's You, the City) by James Sherry 

David Thompson, John Kander and Fred Ebb (USA)
"On the Cusp" (on Thompson's, Kander, and Ebb's The Scottsboro Boys) by Douglas Messerli

Virgil Thomson (USA) see Gertrude Stein
Luis Valdez (USA)
"Dreams Destroyed by Hate" (on Valdez' Zoot Suit) by Douglas Messerli

Aristides Vargas (Argentina)
"The Traveling Table" (on Vargas' La Razón Blindada (Armored Reason) by Douglas Messerli
Royce Vavrek (Canada) [see Missy Mazzoli]

Giuseppe Verdi (Italy)
"Buried Alive" (on AntonioGhislanzoni's and Giuseppe Verdi's Aida) by Douglas Messerli
"Hold My Hand" (on Joseph Méry's, Camille du Locle's and Verdi's Don Carlo)  by Douglas Meserli
"Count Down" (on Piave's and Verdi's La Traviata, based on Alexandre Dumas' La Dame aux  
   Camelias) by Douglas Messerli
"Everybody's Fooled) (on Bioto's and Verdi's  Falstaff, based on Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of
    Windsor and King Henry IV) by Douglas Messerli
"Living in a Glass House without Being Able to See In or Out" (on Bioto's and Verdi's Otello,
    based on the play by Shakespeare) by Douglas Messerli

Gore Vidal (USA)
"The Compromise" (on Vidal's The Best Man) by Douglas Messerli

Richard Wagner (Germany)
"The Devil Meets His Angel" (on Wagner's The Flying Dutchman) by Douglas Messerli
"The Sacred and the Profane" (on Wagner's Parsifal) by Douglas Messerli
"The Sublime and the Ridiculous" (on Wagner's Tristan und Isolde) by Douglas Messerli
"Casting Out the Self" (on Wagner's Die Walküre) by Douglas Messerli

Enda Walsh (England)
"Keeping to the Script" (on Walsh's The Walworth Farce) by Douglas Messerli
"Pool of Survivors" (on Walsh's Penelope) by Douglas Messerli

Ethel Waters (USA)
"Stormy Weather" sung by Ethel Waters (1933) [link]

The Weavers (US singing group)
"If I Had a Hammer" [link]

Frank Wedekind (Germany) [see also Steven Sater and Duncan Shiek (USA)]
"An Audience of the Deaf and Blind" (on Spring Awakening, the musical)

Kurt Weill (Germany/USA)
Recording of Die Dreigroschenoper (The Threepenny Opera) Berlin, 1930 [link]

Arnold Weinstein (USA)
Red Eye of Love
"Eye to Eye" (on Weinstein's Red Eye of Love and Jack Gelber's Square in the Eye) by Douglas Messerli

Mac Wellman (USA)
Bad Penny
The Hidden Part of the US Constitution
The Offending Gesture
"Apropos of The Offending Gesture"
"Tails/Tales" (on Wellman's Bad Penny) by Douglas Messerli
"What American Abandons Abandons America" (on Wellman's Two September) by Douglas
     Messerli
"Harm's Other Way: Some Notes on Mac Wellman's Theater" by Marjorie Perloff
"A Linguistic Fantasia" (on Wellman's A Murder of Crows) by Douglas Messerli
"Music from Another World" (on Wellman's The Hyacinth Macaw) by Douglas Messerli
"You Can't Go Home Again" (on Wellman's Second-Hand Smoke) by Douglas Messerli
"There Are No Such Things as Crows" (on Wellman's The Lesser Magoo) by Douglas Messerli
"Mac Wellman" (interview) by Linda Yablonsky [link]

Arnold Wesker (England)
"Work, Eat, and Die" (on Wesker's Roots) by Douglas Messerli

Oscar Wilde (Ireland)
The Importance of Being Earnest
"Nothing But the Truth" (on Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest) by Douglas Messerli

Thornton Wilder (USA)
"Archetypal America" (on Thornton Wilder's Our Town) by Douglas Messerli

Tennessee Williams (USA)
"Dependent Independents" (on Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire) by Douglas Messerli
"Rise and Shine" (on Williams' The Glass Menagerie) by Douglas Messerli
"Bow Down and Be Dim" (on Williams' Vieux Carre) by Douglas Messerli
"End of the Road" (on Williams' Camino Real) by Douglas Messerli
"Left in the Lurch" (on Williams' play version of Baby Doll) by Douglas Messerli
"Medea's Last Dance" (on Williams' In Masks Outrageous and Austere) by Douglas Messerli
"The Making of Blanche DuBois (on Williams' The Eccentricities of a Nightingale) by Douglas
Messerli

Robert Wilson (USA)
"Nothing on a Lecture (on Robert Wilson's performance of Cage's Lecture on Nothing) by Douglas Messerli

Ermano Wolf-Ferrari (composter) and Enrico Goslisciani (libretto) (Italy)
"Bad Manners" (on Wolf-Ferrari's Il segreto di susanna (Susanna's Secret) by Douglas Messerli

The Wooster Group (USA)

Elizabeth Wray (USA)

Doug Wright (USA)
"Winter in a Summer Town" (on Wright's, Scott Frankel's and Michael Korie's Grey Gardens) by Douglas Messerli 

Grzegorz Wróblewski (Poland/Denmark)
Turning Point

Miwa Yanagi (Japan)
"Can You Hear My Voice?" (on Miwa Yanagi's Zero Hour: Tokyo Rose's Last Tape) by Douglas Messerli

Ozaki Yutata (Japan)
尾崎豊 僕が僕であるために(87年 有明コロシアム song by Ozaki Yutata [link]
Ozaki Yutata song by the Japanese pop-singer [link]

William Butler Yeats (Ireland)
Love and Death (manuscript version)

Stefan Zeromski Theatre (Poland)
"Men in the Streets" (on the Zeromski Theatre's production of In the Solitude of Cotton Fields) by Douglas Messerli







http://ustheater.blogspot.com/2017/08/frank-loesser-adelaides-lament-from.html

Douglas Messerli | "Communal Rituals and Desires" (on Charles Atlas, Rashaun Mitchell, and Silas Riener's dance works, Tesseract)

COMMUNAL RITUALS AND DESIRES
by Douglas Messerli

Charles Atlas (video), Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener (choreographers) Tesseract / Los Angeles, Redcat, the performance I attended with Deborah Meadows was the Sunday, December 3, 2017 matinee

Image result for Tesseract danceCharles Atlas (as photographer) and Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener (as co-choreographers) and principle dancers have created in Tesseract, performed this past week Redcat (the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater) within the bowels the Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles. All three long worked as video director and dancers for Merce Cunningham, and joined up after Cunningham’s death to create their own dance collaborations.
      There is no question that their art still retains a great many of the hallmarks of Cunningham’s company, including their hours of rehearsal without music and their use of quirky and muscular positionings of their bodies, as well as stunning original costumes and carefully-timed group patterning.
     Yet, in Tesseract and other works on which the two beautiful dancers have collaborated with a talented company, some of whom also worked with Cunningham (in particular, David Rafael Botana), and others who have had long experience in dance and choreography themselves, they have also created something very different wherein, despite the work’s overall abstractness, also carries with it subtle narrative patterns.
     Tesseract was broken into two acts, the first of which, Tesseract ⸋ is performed on video only and the second of which Tesseract ○ is performed live behind a scrim on which a camera projects various of their on-stage movements in expanded form.
     The two symbols, cube and circle, hint at the various patterns upon which are played out in the general movements of the entire company. The first, which Atlas has described as a kind of sci-fi story about a group of space aliens, who at times speak in absolute gibberish, while dressed in beautiful white costumes with black cubes attached to them. creating a kind of double-cube patterning or what Los Angeles Times dance reviewer, Laura Bleiberg, pointed out, becomes a cube prism (the costumes having been also designed by the two choreographers).
Image result for Tesseract dance
     In one of the most specular moments of this first part, the figures, backed by large colorful geometric patterns are turned through the tricks of video art into one large kaleidoscopic wonderment. My theater companion for the evening, Deborah Meadows, told me how much as a child she loved her kaleidoscope, playing with it for hours at a time, as had I.
     Yet, I believe the sci-fi aspect of this part to be less convincing than simply a story (if one can imagine one) of a communal group, coming and going, sometimes forcing out one another, while attempting to play out their various sexual feelings for each another. The first piece ends with a stunning sexual pas de deux between Mitchell and Riener, the later having let down his beautiful long tresses (which he previously has worn as a bun in the back his head), while he makes amazing terpsichorean love to Mitchell.
      The only thing I found a bit distracting about this first section, as well somewhat inexplicable, was the constant re-framing of the video dancers, with black borders coming in from both sides. But in a piece that is constantly suggesting a reality from different perspectives, sometimes creating a kind of startling visual confusion, in which, particularly in the later part, it is difficult to know whether to center one’s gaze on the dancers or upon the cinematic-like images, it is surely an intentional device to help us to perceive that human eyes can never truly take in the whole of a group dance performance. Our focus is constantly shifting. For the first section of the dance, the audience members were asked to don 3-D glasses, which also took the work into other dimensions.
Image result for Tesseract dance      The second part of Tesseract begins very much like the first with a pattern of a cube, the figures this time clad in mesh-textured white robes, who enter, one by one, to fit into the pattern; but as the group expands, breaking away into other lesser connected groups, they come together as a circle of interlocking hands. When one of their midst seems to suffer from a series of muscle spasms, he breaks way from the others, as several of them try, unsuccessfully, it appears, to bring him back into the community. It is perhaps only when the red-clad cameraman, Ryan Jenkins, whose images project the same dancers in giant-size images on the scrim, that allows them each, one by one, to come into their own individuality, while retaining on the stage behind a sense of communal ritual that vaguely reminded me, at moments, of Stravinsky’s and Nijinsky’s powerful Rite of Spring, but of course without the insistent narrative aspects of that work. These are neither primitives nor a community determined to sacrifice one of their own for anything, but simply a communal gathering working to interact (or even “tesseract,” a word that suggests a wrinkle in time-traveling) with each other. In the end, even the red-garbed, sequined-shoed cameraman joins in on their strenuous group celebration.
     I do agree with Bleiberg that, as much as I truly love the Redcat space, perhaps Tesseract might have been more successfully performed on a large stage such as Brooklyn’s BAM. Evidently some couldn’t observe the interplay of images and performers, particularly from the higher levels of the theater. I sat closer to the stage and had no difficulty perceiving them. But these are minor quibbles about a major work which I was delighted to see on a Los Angeles stage, and can only congratulate the Redcat staff for scheduling it.


Los Angeles, December 4, 2017